The Smartest Kids in the World (35) 更多

  • 第218页
    What the teacher is saying should be so interesting that the kids are sitting on the edge of their seat, hanging on every word. It’s intellectual spark that holds and keeps their attention, not ba...
  • 第216页
    How do you make your teachers better? The more specifics you hear in response to this question, the better. Most teachers operate without meaningful feedback, in isolation. That is indefensible tod...
  • 第64页
    Korea did not wait to fix poverty before radically improving its education system, including its teacher colleges. This faith in education and prople had catapulted Korea into the developed world.
  • 第61页
    The problem was not that Korean kids weren't learning enough or working hard enough; it was that they weren't working smart. The Iron Child culture was contagious; it was hard for kids and parents ...
  • 第60页
    Korea's sky-high PISA scores were mostly a function of students' tireless efforts, not the country's schools. Kids and their families drove the results. Motivation explained Korea's PISA scores mor...
  • 第59页
    the system is as predictable as it was brutal. University admissions were based on students' skills as measured by the test. Full stop. Nobody got accepted because he was good at sports ot because ...
  • 第23页
    PISA demanded fluency in problem solving and the ability to communicate; in other words, the basic skills I needed to do my job and take care of my family in a world chocked with information and su...
  • 第19页
    Without data, you are just another person with an opinion...
  • 第17页
    In essence, PISA revealed what should have been obvious but was not: that spending on education did not make kids smarter. Everything -- everything -- depended on what teachers, parents, and studen...
  • 第174页
    That inequity nagged at Andrew Kim. Even though this system had made him a millionaire, he didn't see it as a model for anyone. "I don't think this is the ideal way," he said. "This leads to a vici...
  • 第120页
    In one study of U.S. eighth graders, for example, the best predictor of academic performance was not the children's IQ scores -- but their self-discipline. Mastery of math never made anyone get to ...
  • 第119页
    Wealth had made rigor unnecessary in the United Stated States, historically speaking. In isolation, there was nothing wrong with sports, of course. But they didn't operate in isolation. Combined wi...
  • 第117页
    The education superpowers believed in rigor. People in these countries agreed on the purpose of school: School existed to help students master complex academic material. Other things mattered, too,...
  • 第116页
    In Korea and Finland, despite all their differences, everyone -- kids, parents, and teachers -- saw getting an education as a serious quest, more important than sports or self-esteem. This consensu...
  • 第113页
    Parents inhabited the sweet spot between the two: they were warm, responsive, and close to their kids, but, as their children got older, they gave them freedom to explore and to fail and to make th...
  • 第112页
    Praise that was vague, insincere, or excessive tended to discourage kids from working hard and trying new things. just asking children about their school days and showing genuine interest in what t...
  • 第111页
    If parents simply read for pleasure at home on their own, their children were more likely to enjoy reading, too. That pattern held fast across very different countries and different levels of famil...
  • 第109页
    At the same time, many American parents worried about robbing their children of the joys of childhood through structured learning. They suspected that children learned best through undirected free ...
  • 第108页
    When children were young, parents who read to them everyday had kinds who performed much better in reading, all around the world, by the time they were fifteen. What did reading to your kids mean? ...
  • 第107页
    Parenting, live drive and diligence, was often ignored in international studies of education. The evidence that did exist tended to focus on one country only, and it generally showed what you'd exp...
  • 第191页
    Their teachers were more serious, too; highly educated, well-trained, and carefully chosen. They had enough autonomy to do serious work; that meant they had a better chance of adapting and changing...
  • 第192页
    Kids in hamster-wheel countries knew what it felt like to grapple with complex ideas and think outside their comfort zone; they understood the value of persistence. They knew what it felt like to f...
  • 第195页
    She taught him, for example, never to send misbehaving students into the hallway as a form of punishment. Find another way to get them to behave. School was not a good-behavior factory; it was a le...
  • 第203页
    Arranging for young people to live and study thousands of miles from home is a complicated, risky business; the people who do it well are dedicated to the simple idea that the world is a big and wo...
  • 第209页
    Kids should be uncomfortable sometimes; that’s okay. They should not be frustrated or despairing; instead, they should be getting help when they need it, often from each other. They should not spe...
  • 第210页
    When you are visiting a school, you obviously cannot conduct a scientifically valid survey like this. But the questions that most correlated with student learning in that survey might help shape qu...
  • 第213页
    Parents who view themselves as educational coaches tend to read to their children every day when they are small; when their children get older they talk with them about their days and about the new...
  • 第164页
    What did it mean, then, that respected U.S. educational leaders and professors in teachers colleges were indoctrinating young teachers with the mindset that poverty trumped everything else? What d...
  • 第181页
    Depending on what happened next, in other words, Kin, Eric, and Tom could essentially be living in different countries than kids they’d sat next to in kindergarten. So much remained unknown about ...
  • 第163页
    "Wealth doesn't mean a thing," he said. "It's your brain that counts. These kids know that from very young . We are all the same. " The more time I spent in Finland, the more I started to think tha...
  • 第133页
    Teachers would be free to choose their own textbooks and their curriculum from over one hundred approved options, along with their own professional development. They would start earning bonuses bas...
  • 第107页
    Most Korean parents saw themselves as coaches, while American parents tended to act more like cheerleaders. He could tell that Korean kids encountered high expectations very early in their lives, a...
  • 第100页
    American kids didn't study much because, well, they didn't have to. "Not much is demanded of U.S. students," she said. In Finland, her exams were usually essay tests, requiring her to write three o...
  • 第54页
    how it felt to really learn -- to think and discover things for the sake of discovery, not because it was what he was supposed to do.
  • 第15页
    Those tests usually qualified students' preparedness for more schooling, not their preparedness for life.

名家谈教育 (1)

  • 第56页
    就学生发面来说,如果进入一所各科只开设与其他学科完全分开的、只有本科专业课程的大学,那对他的教育将是不利的。因为这样一来,理科学生势必放弃对哲学与文学的爱好,使他们失去了在这方面的造诣机会。结果他...

译边草 (2)

  • 译者的气质
    不善感,就不善于甚至不能够去亲近;不耐静,就会不耐烦甚至不屑于去亲近。 论empathy对于翻译的重要性和必要性
  • 翻译要靠感觉
    “一个艺术家若不比常人更为善感,是不成的。”这是汪曾祺写到沈从文先生时说的。在他心目中,“沈先生是个感情丰富的人,非常容易动情,非常容易受感动。”。 汪先生自己也是善感的人,看到一些“如闻其声”的平...

最好金龟换酒 (5)

  • PART 16 魔鬼的银矿
    小时候看《西游记》,唐太宗游地府的时候,发现不但很多坏人在这里受苦,连好人也得下来,先经过一番审判,才能决定他下一世的去向。可是眼前这些勤劳朴实的矿工们还未死去便已日复一日地经受地狱之苦,这个世界...
  • PART 12 古道西风草泥马
    很多人都将历史看作是一部竞争史——“文明先进”的欧洲殖民者用兵器和火药打败了“野蛮落后”的印第安人,那么拉丁美洲的贫穷和落后就是其在竞争中失败的结果。殖民者胜利了,拉美人失败了。可是不对,事情并不...
  • PART 4 山中日记
    和Carlos聊天的时候,我觉得世界是平的。可是我也知道,就在这个诊所的百米之外,世界已然出现了断层。那些有趣的对话,那些别致的爱好,那些丰富的感情,全都一一坠落到深邃的谷底。在这个世界的另一个平面上,...
  • PART 2 不可能更好的起点
    有时候我们选择改变,并非经过深思熟虑,而更像是听见了天地间冥冥中的呼唤,呼唤你前往另一个地方,过上另一种生活。你也许会发现,山那边的世界并没有吃人的野兽,反而开满了在你的家乡随处可见的凤凰花;那里...
  • 序 福山
    如果有人能够理解你,那么即便与你待在房间里,也会如同在通往世界的道路上旅行。 每天挤在沙丁鱼罐头般的地铁车厢里,或是步行穿过那条地下通道的时候,望着身边几乎清一色穿着黑色西装的人群,我的心中一片澄明...

泛若不系之舟 (14) 更多

  • 后记:满船空载月明归
    努力压抑着鼻腔的酸楚和心中的起伏。虽然早知道聚散无常,但偏偏情之所钟,唯在吾辈。 在那些新闻里,我看见的不是新闻本身,而是曾经在路上遇见过的人们,以及彼此相遇相处的时刻所堆积起来的记忆。和我熟悉的同...
  • 归路许多长
    望着那幅铺展在群山之间、美得不可思议的巨大佛像,我想虽然佛陀说万物皆为幻象,可是幻象之中还有美。而当美出现的时候,它太真实了。 真正的自由不是随心所欲无法无天,不是疯狂消费的痛快淋漓,也不是放弃社会...
  • 越走越南
    将“西贡”改名为“胡志明市”,如果当时的越南有股市的话,我想当天的旅游股指数一定跌得惨不忍睹。 前金融从业者的职业敏锐
  • 何意世多艰
    只有不属于时间的事物,才会在时间里永不消失。 命运。最让人难过的,就是一切都只能归咎于命运。我和铭基过着比Sara富裕和自由得多的生活,并非因为我们比他更聪明或更努力,而仅仅是因为我们比他运气好,没有出...
  • 破晓
    来了。我们呆呆地坐在那里,眼看着第一缕金光投射在自己身上,今人与古塔一同被点亮。我的心为这渺小和伟大间极偶然又仿佛宿命般的相遇震颤不已,灵魂飞到了空中,over the hills and far away(越过山丘,到达远...
  • 在路上
    我转过头去看窗外。此时夜黑如墨,冷月高悬。我努力地分辨着车窗外的风景,却看见玻璃窗上反映出一张张愉快的笑脸——显然这是一出喜剧,尽管音箱里传里的缅甸语听上去像是呜咽。乘客们完全沉浸在剧情中,他们不...
  • 仰光
    我注视着身边的缅甸人。他们仰头凝望巨大的佛塔,口中念念有词。金光反射在他们的脸上,宛如来世的荣光。大金塔以外的地方依然一片漆黑,整座城市似乎都在仰望着唯一的一处光明,在暗夜中静静等待清晓莅临的那一...
  • 三个泰语词之一:Bangkok
    很少有西方人不爱亚洲的也是,这是他们的“东方梦”中早已预演过的宿世繁华,是他们在自己发达却冰冷的国家里无法体验到的热闹文化。
  • 佳期
    四 …… 说到底,我和奈保尔笔下的那些假惺惺地谈论着“穷人的快乐,穷人的姿态,穷人的尊严”的中产阶级又到底有何不同呢?我既看不惯中产阶级的虚伪、做作和优越感,又受不了社会底层小人物的无知、粗俗和缺...
  • 我的27号
    他不看任何地方,一双眼睛似闭非闭——事实上,在我的印象里,他似乎很少睁着眼睛打量着世界,仿佛这世上没有属于他的位置,因此不得不退避到它最外层的边缘。 习惯了离别,自然也要习惯无情。 结束工作走出大...
  • 天使在人间
    用年轻人独有的热情拥抱各种全新的可能性。去哪里和做什么其实都不重要,能够跳出井底本身已经是摆脱狭隘和偏见的第一步,你从此便会知道外面的世界广袤无边,而世上有那么多人正过着你的想象力无法触及的生活。 ...
  • 天堂地狱加尔各答
    世界上很多城市的现代化进程都不外乎“破旧立新”,然而眼前的加尔各答却像个固执的老人,尽管免不了被时代的滚滚洪流裹挟着冲向前方,但所有的新物事和老古董却都被他死死抱在怀里,一样也舍不得丢弃。
  • 朝圣果阿
    我一边喝着啤酒一边用kindle看小说,铭基和旁边的德国男生则躺在沙滩椅上用手机上网。我不禁有点儿感慨:虚拟的网络世界和层出不穷的电子产品给我们这一代人提供了避难所和迷幻药,而当年的嬉皮们却只能以自己的肉身...
  • 重返印度
    一 那片土地上传统深植而禁忌丛生,却也一直有人勇敢地打破命运释放灵魂。 手中的面团如同他身上的孤独一般越拉越长,我站在门外默默地看着他,感觉颇有点儿不可思议。男儿在他乡,焉得不憔悴。你的他乡是我的...
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