How We Decide的笔记(22)

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  • warton

    warton

    intead of praising kids for trying hard, teachers typically praise them for their innate intelligence (being smart). this type of encouragement actually backfires ,since it leads students to see mistakes as sighs of stupidity and not as the building blocks of knowlege. the regrettable outcome is that kids never learn how to lean.

    2012-04-03 15:40

  • Lion

    Lion (做人好做事对才是学问)

    The only way to counteract the bias for certainty is to encourage some inner dissonance. We must force ourselves to think about the information we don't want to think about, to pay attention to the data that disturbs our entrenched beliefs. when making decisions, actively resist the urge to suppress the argument. Instead, take the time to listen to what all the different brain areas have to sa...

    2015-01-26 20:59

  • Lion

    Lion (做人好做事对才是学问)

    Emotions are adept at finding patterns based on experience, so that a person can detect the missile amid the blur of radar blips. But when you encounter a problem you've never experienced before, when your dopamine neurons have no idea what to do, it's essential that you try to tune out your feelings. Pilots call such a state "deliberate calm," because staying calm in high-pressure situ...

    2015-01-26 18:42

  • Lion

    Lion (做人好做事对才是学问)

    emotions are a crucial part of the decision-making process. When we are cut off from our feelings, the most banal decisions became impossible. A brain that can't feel can't make up its mind. The process of thinking requires feeling, for feelings are what let us understand all the information that we can't directly comprehend. Reason without emotion is impotent. According to James, the mind c...

    2015-01-26 18:12

  • David

    David

    The madman is the man who has lost everything except his reason!

    2013-04-14 20:12

  • David

    David

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice ,shame on my dopamine neurons.

    2013-03-12 11:30

  • 自求多福totoro

    自求多福totoro (Veritas vincit)

    Tetlock explained the difference between successful and unsuccessful pundits with an allusion to an ancient metaphor made famous by historian Isaiah Berlin in his essay "The Hedgehog and the Fox." (Berlin's title is a reference to the ancient Greek expression "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.") In that essay, Berlin distinguished between two ty...

    2012-05-26 12:25

  • 自求多福totoro

    自求多福totoro (Veritas vincit)

    While the anatomy of evil remains incomplete, neuroscientists are beginning to identify the specific deficits that define the psychopathic brain. The main problem seems to be a broken amygdala, a brain area responsible for propagating aversive emotions such as fear and anxiety. As a result, psychopaths never feel bad when they make other people feel bad. Aggression doesn't make them nervous. Terro...

    2012-05-26 12:24

  • 自求多福totoro

    自求多福totoro (Veritas vincit)

    The brain relies on mental accounting because it has such limited processing abilities. As Thaler notes, "These thinking problems come from the fact that we have a slow, erratic CPU [central processing unit] and the fact that we're busy." Since the prefrontal cortex can handle only about seven things at the same time, it's constantly trying to "chunk" stuff together, to make th...

    2012-05-26 12:24

  • 自求多福totoro

    自求多福totoro (Veritas vincit)

    When you overthink at the wrong moment, you cut yourself off from the wisdom of your emotions, which are much better at assessing actual preferences. You lose the ability to know what you really want. And then you choose the worst strawberry jam.

    2012-05-26 12:24

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How We Decide

>How We Decide